Latest Blog


DEPRESSION AT CHRISTMAS

It’s not true that suicide rates are highest over the holiday season.  In fact, if anything, they’re lower at that time of the year than from April through to October.  Be that as it may, though, the onset of Christmas and New Year festivities bring a lot of people down.

Are the ‘holiday blues’ threatening to affect you?  If your family circumstances have changed in the last few years due to losing a loved one, divorce, illness or financial struggles, you may be feeling a twist in the pit of your stomach when you think of the end of year break.

It’s natural – and far more common than you might suppose.  Most people who have been used to celebrating Yuletide with the usual companions at old, familiar haunts are ill-prepared for the “It’s just not the same!” feeling at the end of the year.  The impression that everyone else is having a wonderful time surrounded by their nearest and dearest merely drives the discomfort home.

So how can you prepare yourself – be armed against depression at Christmas?

 

  • RECOGNISE YOUR SECRET PLAN TO ISOLATE YOURSELF FURTHER

If you’re without family this year and your friends are already spoken for, you might be sidling towards a ‘quiet one’.  That’s fine, as long as you know why you’re doing it.  If you’re already struggling with feelings of anxiety and a low mood, you will make these feelings worse by isolating yourself further.

You might think, “I’m not making plans for Christmas this year”, but in fact, you already have:  you’re planning to be alone.

Most people who do this are attempting to avoid all the talk about family that comes from everywhere.  Even on your own at Christmas, you won’t be able to escape it; it’s all over the TV, internet and radio … If you’ve lost family recently, being a captive audience to that sort of talk is really rubbing salt into the wound.

Resist the urge to hide.  Rather, make a plan to counter it, even it it’s just for a short while.

 

  • MAKE A POINT OF SEEING PEOPLE

The right ones, that is.  You don’t have to do anything huge – no packing bags and staying over.  Mix it up a little:  make your home your base and set up two or three small meet ups.  A coffee and mince pie here, a late nightcap there … short and sweet get togethers that are just as easy to call short as they are to extend, if the mood is right.

Make a habit of going out over the Christmas week.  You don’t have to make plans with anybody in particular; just take yourself out.  Find a coffee shop, go to a movie, amble round a shopping mall … people watch.  It’s important for you to feel connected and in control.

 

  • CALL SOMEONE WHO’S ALSO ‘HAVING A QUIET ONE’

There’s bound to be someone you know who’s also secretly dreading Christmas.  You’re not alone.  Call them and arrange that quick coffee meet up.  There’s everything to gain …

 

  • MAKE THE MOST OF AN UNUSUAL CHRISTMAS

Remember that not every year is going to be like this one.  If there’s one thing you can be sure of it’s that things will change.  That’s Life – they always do.  Given that, you can treat this Christmas differently to the others without worrying that next year will be the same.

There’s something to be said for a quieter Christmas.  The trick is to arrange things a little in advance.  Today’s your day to start ….

 

Latest Blog

TRAVEL CAN BOOST YOUR MENTAL HEALTH

It’s that time of year when lots of people go on holiday.  How about you?...

Read More

DEPRESSION AT CHRISTMAS

It’s not true that suicide rates are highest over the holiday season.  In fact, if...

Read More

AUTHENTIC YOU, HAPPIER YOU

“What did you want to be when you grew up?” is a question that either...

Read More

2019 © Copyright Rob Goddard